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Introducing the next Fed chairman… hopefully

For those still putting energy into gleaming facts about what’s happening in the world from the MSM you’ve probably heard them try and tell you that Ron Paul’s presidential campaign has come and gone and is essentially just winding down. But is it really?

Putting aside the stunningly obvious but astonishing non-reporting of the seemingly epidemic election fraud directed against Dr Paul’s campaign (to such an extent that even Dr Paul alluded to it with journalists recently) it appears as if the campaign is doing rather well where it matters, getting delegates.

If the recent delegate selection process in Missouri  is anything to go by, Ron Paul is going to arrive at the republican national convention in Tampa on August 14th with a lot more delegates than anyone currently thinks.

As unbelievable as it sounds the very unlikely event of brokered convention in Tampa (something that hasn’t happened in the Republican party since 1948) is now looking very much like the most likely outcome. But the outcome of that is certainly far from being known.

In short Ron Paul still has a real shot, with the convention still some 5 months away that’s a lifetime in these financial markets where ‘out-of-the-blue’ news can break and spin everything on a dime – perhaps even enough to get the last vestiges of the paradigm to shift and secure the Presidency for the only man running on anything remotely resembling sanity amongst a field of the very much ‘un-sane’.

So we thought it would be really worth while to introduce you to the new Fed chair should the American public at large discover said sanity from down the back of the sofa over the next 5 months.

One of the prerogatives of the President of the USofA is to select the chair of the Federal Reserve. A few months back members of the press asked Dr Paul who he would pick as his Fed chair. The question seemed to be offered more as ‘gotcha’ type of journalism, after all surely the man who has carved out a tireless 30 year career on ending the Fed wouldn’t have given the question any serious thought? Wrong. When asked Ron Paul suggested that Jim Grant would be a great pick.

So who is Jim Grant? He is the founder of Grant’s Interest Rate Observer, a financial journal in print for 30 years dedicated to keeping the Fed honest – a very tough job as it has turned out .

But rather than just give you the lifted bio from wiki here is Grant’s recent hour long lecture in Congress on the topic of “What does the Fed do?”. A title we feel would have been much better had it been “The Fed does what?”, but we split hairs.

The hour long talk is perfect for those wanting to gain some introductory information on the topic of the Fed without having to drift down the conspiratorial meme that is all to frequently the only attack point on the Fed. In short the lecture is a ‘must watch’.

We hope you agree with us that Jim Grant would not only make a good Fed chairman but would quickly become the greatest Fed chair to occupy the top office at the Marriner Eccles building in Washington. He’d certainly be the first chair to pull-off wearing a bow-tie with any ‘aplomb’…

Now where are those remaining delegates again?

Link to this article: : http://www.goldmadesimplenews.com/gold/introducing-the-next-fed-chairman-hopefully-6429/

Posted by on Mar 26 2012. Filed under Analysis, Gold News, Interviews, Markets. You can follow any responses to this entry through the RSS 2.0. You can skip to the end and leave a response. Pinging is currently not allowed.

4 Comments for “Introducing the next Fed chairman… hopefully”

  1. This is some great reporting. I had never heard of Jim Grant, but now I’m gonna learn some stuff! /ronpaul

  2. This is some great reporting. I had never heard of Jim Grant, but now I’m gonna learn some stuff! /ronpaul

  3. This is some great reporting. I had never heard of Jim Grant, but now I’m gonna learn some stuff! /ronpaul

  4. This is some great reporting. I had never heard of Jim Grant, but now I’m gonna learn some stuff! /ronpaul

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